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Nov
02

No surprises so far…

Posted By · November 2, 2010 at 6:52 pm

The Associated Press called the races for Republican US House incumbents Dan Burton and Mike Pence shortly after the polls closed…no surprises there.

Hoosiers appear to favor the property tax cap amendment, with 67 percent in favor – but it’s early hours yet. Only two percent of precincts are reporting.

Republican Dan Coats has a strong early lead and it’s possible NBC will project Coats the winner of the US Senate seat at the top of the hour.

More updates to come…

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Oct
25

On the record

Posted By · October 25, 2010 at 1:06 pm

Last week Eyewitness News interviewed six candidates from three key races – US Senate, Marion County prosecutor and Marion County sheriff. We asked each candidate the same set of questions pertinent to the office they’re running for.

You can watch the videos here.

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Oct
11

Libertarian candidate gets creative

Posted By · October 11, 2010 at 2:33 pm

While preparing a story about tonight’s Senate debate at IUPUI, I was looking for a picture of the Libertarian candidate, Rebecca Sink-Burris.

I was pleased to find several high-resolution pictures on her campaign website, but this one made me laugh:

Libertarian candidate for US Senate Rebecca Sink-Burris

Which of course begs the question…if Libertarians were to adopt a mascot, like the GOP’s elephant or the Democrats’ donkey, what would it be?

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Aug
30

Freedom of speech confusion

Posted By · August 30, 2010 at 3:28 pm

A strange comment came up on WTHR’s Facebook page the other day. A guy took a swipe at IMPD with regards to Officer David Bisard’s alleged drunk driving crash, but he did so in a thread about a tragic story about Peter Lenz, the 13-year-old killed while motorcycle racing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Sunday.

Other commenters quickly called him out on it, saying it wasn’t the place for his comment. His response? He complained that they were violating his “freedom of speech.”

Does freedom of speech mean freedom from criticism? Because it seems to me when you put your opinion out there for everyone to see, you should be prepared to defend yourself. The original commenter was expressing his opinion, but so were the people who responded to him. He might have said, “Hey, sorry if I offended people by bringing that up, but it’s really been on my mind lately.”

The thing about having a free and open society is that everyone is allowed to express themselves – without fear of being jailed by their government after publishing a story about government corruption, for example. When it comes to casual interactions, the lines are blurrier. Someone says “you can’t say that!” and somebody else says “Yes I can! You’re violating my freedom of speech by telling me I can’t say that!”

The cool thing about Facebook et al is that it allows people to engage with each other and share ideas and opinions in real time…in a public forum. That means we need to be prepared to take a little pushback sometimes. If you don’t like it, you can always start your own blog…and disable comments!

Categories : From the Web Desk
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Jul
08

Comments on comments

Posted By · July 8, 2010 at 10:28 am

One of the great things about life in the modern age is that it’s interactive. Media used to be a one-way street. Now you can read a story online and immediately rattle off your opinion about the topic of the story, the typo in the third paragraph, the writer’s predilection for unnecessary adverbs or a TV anchor’s hair style or suit.

For the humble web content producer, this means that on any given story, there may be a long string of anonymous comments which, in some unfortunate circumstances, may be used in court battles as evidence that a jury was unduly influenced by them. Generally speaking, this is not considered a good thing. Why should readers be able to leave anonymous comments? Shouldn’t they stand by their opinion? Internet advocates argue that your site should be accessible and interactive, without too many barriers – like making people log in to leave comments.

These are questions that are being seriously debated in the world of journalism. What is a news outlet’s responsibility when it comes to allowing such comments on stories? What if a comment is blatantly racist or sexist? What if it’s on the line of what’s acceptable, and who draws that line? Is that censorship?

In answer to the last question, you bet it is. I don’t think hate speech has any place anywhere, and if I see that a comment has crossed the line of what I feel comfortable with on the site, I will delete it. On WTHR.com, we also have a system whereby other users can flag a comment as inappropriate. If three people flag it, it comes back to the moderator for another look.

It’s all about balance. We want to give readers the opportunity to react to stories and to share their opinions or experiences. But more often than not, they also share their prejudices too. For me, if those opinions become too hateful, or if they appear to be libelous (e.g. “that woman is a liar!”), I don’t allow them. But it’s a very tough call, because it’s subjective. Some sites allow everything and let their readers do the policing. WTHR.com uses a moderator who looks at all incoming comments.

One thing to consider is your workplace’s anti-harassment policy. It will probably state that there will be no discrimination based on race, color, gender, national origin, religion or disability, among other things. When you post a comment on a story, think about whether your statement is a criticism based on those points. If everyone would just give a little more thought to their gut reactions, we’d probably all have a better chance at dialogue and discussion.

Categories : From the Web Desk
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May
24

Fort Wayne anchor to run for 3rd district

Posted By · May 24, 2010 at 11:57 am

WPTA reports that one of their morning anchors will run for Mark Souder’s vacated seat.

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May
24

Romney’s PAC contributes to five Indiana GOP candidates

Posted By · May 24, 2010 at 11:55 am

Mitt Romney has announced endorsements for several Indiana candidates.

Romney’s Free and Strong America PAC says it’s sending the following five candidates a total of $15,000 in contributions:

Dan Coats (US Senate)
Larry Bucshon (8th District)
Todd Rokita (4th District)
Todd Young (9th District)
Jackie Walorski (2nd District)

Coats is getting the max $5,000 general election contribution towards his US Senate campaign, while the US House candidates are getting $2,500 each from Romney’s PAC.

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May
21

Bike to Work: Point Counterpoint!

Posted By · May 21, 2010 at 11:47 am

It’s Bike to Work Day. That may mean nothing to you, or, for the teeny tiny minority of central Indiana residents who ride their bike to work, that may mean a small sense of validation for a lifestyle decision for which we are marginalized and ridiculed by the SUV-driving cycnical masses.

CityBeat reporter Mary Milz and WTHR.com web content manager Sara Galer put together a “point counterpoint” list of reasons why we bike to work. Or not, as the case may be.

Here’s Mary:

Why I don’t bike to work.

I work out regularly. I run, swim and during the summer months, I bike, but I don’t bike to work. I feel mildly guilty about that but I have a litany of excuses that I rattle off to my colleague Sara Galer, who rides religiously. Here are my reasons why I DON’T bike to work.

1) I have to go to bed and wake up early to accommodate the extra 25 minutes it would take to get to work. I treasure my zzzzzz’s

2) I can’t fit everything I need for the day in a backpack – make-up, hair dryer, shoes, clothes, towel, toiletries, etc (that’s not to mention getting a suit to work without crumpling it up in a ball of wrinkles.)

3) That means pre-planning – bringing everything to work a day or two before. Heck, I can’t even get my lunch packed the night before!

4) The shower thing – we have one at work, which is great but it’s like a shower you’d find on a small sailboat… Plus I’d have to wait in line for Sara and other colleagues who occassionally ride in.

5) I carry extra gear in my car – hats, gloves, boots, jeans, etc. Just in case I’m sent to cover, say flooding.

6) What if I need to meet someone for lunch – no wheels. Do I show up in biking clothes?

7) I like the Monon but riding downtown can get a little crazy, especially at rush hour.

8) What if the weather changes? It’s fine on the way in, but what if it starts to pour or storm when I’m ready to leave?

9) And, what if my plans change? I suddenly need to be somewhere after work? What if it’s across town? What if it’s after dark? You’re not supposed to ride the Monon after dusk (and before dawn.)

10) I’m sometimes tired after a long day and still have to get home and get a run or swim in – which brings me back to zzzzzzzz’s.

I admire you Sara – you are my hero, but I just don’t think I have the pedal power in me to ride to work on a regular basis.

My reply:

Okay, let’s just get a few things straight here. I don’t do anything religiously, unless it involves eating some sort of decadent chocolate dessert. However when the weather permits, I do enjoy riding my bike to work as often as possible. I would also like to differentiate my bike riding habits from my husband’s, which verge on the fanatical. He rides in the winter, sometimes in snow, occasionally on ice, which results in elbow injuries that take a long time to heal, and relies on me to drive the car so I can pick him up if the weather is really bad. So I might be crazy, but not THAT crazy.

1) It takes me about 15-20 minutes to drive, or about 40 minutes to cycle. If the wind is with me, it can be as short as 30 minutes. Sometimes it takes longer if I have to stand on the pedals! Although it does probably add a good 40 minutes to my commute, I don’t mind the prep time because being outside and getting exercise at both ends of my day makes it worth it.

2) Since I’m behind the scenes here at WTHR, I don’t have to make myself beautiful like the reporters do. I carry a set of clean clothes, shoes and a towel. My office casual look usually survives the bike ride. Unless I forget to bring pants.

3) I usually pack my bike bag the night before and then make a game-day decision after checking the weather forecast.

4) It’s true we have a shower room at WTHR. It’s also true that it’s a little scary. I use it for those 90+degree days. Otherwise I just air dry, wash my face, apply deodorant and hope for the best. I also sit a good distance away from my colleagues in the mornings, something they’re probably grateful for.

5) Again, not being a roving reporter, I know that most of my day will be in the office. Which makes my time on the bike all the more appreciated.

6) If I have to meet a friend for lunch, I either hop on my bike or make them pick me up at work!

7) I get off the Monon at 14th, then make my way through the old North Side to WTHR at 10th and Meridian. It’s not too treacherous. Come on, Mary, that’s a feeble excuse!

8) I won’t disagree with you here. I’ve occasionally asked colleagues for a ride home due to unpredictable weather. Rain is unpleasant, but thunderstorms are scary. We report the news. We don’t want to BE the news. Like that guy in Goshen who went outside to roll up the windows on his truck, then was struck by lightning. Now he can’t even count to ten.

9) It’s true that taking your bike to work limits what you can do with regards to making plans later in the evening. Fortunately, there are many bars and restaurants not far from the Monon that are within reach, if you are desperate for that post-work beer. It also takes planning to make sure you are not cycling in the dark.

10) If I refrained from exercise every time I felt tired, I would probably never get off the couch! I like the challenge of biking to work. Some days are a good workout, other days I’m just slodging through and cursing the wind, dodging stray dogs and chain-wielding teenagers (it’s a bit like Grand Theft Auto in that respect). But I get to observe things I would never see in a car (a red-winged blackbird on a fence, Lilly volunteers painting a mural on community day, KIBI folks watering the little trees along the side of the Monon), and it’s a fantastic stress reducer. And once I’m home, I’ve already put in about 14 miles for the day!

What Mary didn’t say is that she runs marathons and triathlons….something that I would never have the self-discipline for! So Mary, I think you’re the real athlete. I’m just a wanna-be! (I should also mention that I supplement the bike riding with Crossfit, a GREAT way to get in shape!)

Categories : From the Web Desk
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